Ocean thermal energy conversion act of 1980
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Ocean thermal energy conversion act of 1980 hearings before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on S. 2492 ... April 10 and May 1, 1980. by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

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Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Ocean thermal power plants -- Law and legislation -- United States

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF26 .C69 1980o
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 164 p. :
Number of Pages164
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4238552M
LC Control Number80603076

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Ocean thermal energy conversion act of hearings before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on S. April 10 and May 1, Get this from a library! Ocean thermal energy conversion act of [an act to regulate commerce, promote energy self-sufficiency, and protect the environment ].. [United States.]. Get this from a library! Ocean thermal energy conversion act of the report to accompany H.R. [United States. Congress. House. Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries.]. References in Text. This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “this Act”, meaning Pub. L. 96–, Aug. 3, , 94 Stat. , known as the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of , which is classified principally to this complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out below and Tables.

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act (OTECA) of limits the ownership, construction and operation of offshore ocean thermal energy facilities and plantships to those licensed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Under OTECA, several ederal agencies assist NOAA f in the OTEC licensing process. The U.S. Coast Guard. The United States Code is meant to be an organized, logical compilation of the laws passed by Congress. At its top level, it divides the world of legislation into fifty topically-organized Titles, and each Title is further subdivided into any number of logical subtopics. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) makes use of the temperature differences between the deep cold and relatively warmer surface waters of the ocean to generate a constant, clean source of electricity. This constancy differs from the output of renewable resources such as wind and wave energy that sometimes produce intermittent electricity. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Karen Anne Finney University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is a process that employs the natural temperature difference between the surface and the depths of the ocean. First introduced in , OTEC has been described as an effective and renewable energy Size: KB.

Reported by the joint conference committee on J ; agreed to by the Senate on J and by the House on J Signed into law by President Jimmy Carter on J The Energy Security Act was signed into law by U.S. President Jimmy Carter on J Enacted by: the 96th United States Congress. Ocean thermal energy conversion act of hearings before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth. ocean surface water and cooler deep water to produce energy. There is a need to state jurisdictional authority over these new ac-tivities' and to formulate government policies concerning regula-tion.' Congress has passed the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of (the Act)3 to facilitate commercial development of this. The ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development, and Demonstration Act establishes goals for the Department of Energy OTEC development and mandates the pace of OTEC output growth; the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of sets up regulations that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will govern the licensing Author: David I. Shapiro.